How to Successfully Launch Your Book(Part Two)

Obviously, you are excited that you have finally published your book, but how do you tell the world about it?

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Careful planning will help make your launch a success

Unless you are an already a well-established author, one of those who the publishers are promoting and escorting on a book tour, how you organise the launch will probably be up to you.

Fiction or Non-Fiction?

As stated earlier each requires a different approach.

Fiction.

What genre is your book?

Thriller. Murder, Cosy Crime, Domestic Noir. Women’s fiction, Chic-Lit, Adventure, Romance, Paranormal, Fantasy. Sci-Fi. Saga. Historical, Memoir, Short stories Children’s’ books, Picture books.

Each of these could be launched using a different approach depending on your venue, budget and your creativity.

A romance novel demands a changed approach to a thriller which will attract a mixed audience, while romance is more likely to attract a mainly female one

You may want to reflect your genre in your launch colour scheme and promotional materials, flyers, bookmarks and props.

Giveaways. Bookmarks, stickers, charms anything with your name and book title. Bought wisely they cost very little and add to your presentation.

For my launch of Fire& Ice, I had giveaway charms of ice skates, or snowflakes or a Viking helmet. Each was packaged with a card promoting my blog. which I gave away with each book sold.

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Viking helmet, pair of Ice Skates, Snowflake.

Another genre would demand an alternative approach-a thriller, mini binoculars, murder a magnifying glass or handcuffs charm.

Put your creativity to work in imaging how will you make your book launch stand out?

Your nonfiction book.

So many topics, Money, Parenting, Health, Business, Coaching, Fitness, Diet, Cooking, Animals. Gardening. To an extent, your topic will define where to hold your launch.

For example, it wouldn’t really make sense to launch a money-making book at a playgroup. Yes, you may have some interest, but they are not really your target audience. You’d be better off with an upmarket inner-city café, or even a bank-themed restaurant.

Your parenting book would be perfect to launch at a playgroup, kindy or even your local library.

Maybe you could launch your gardening book at a local garden centre or even a cafe in a park?

Top Tips

 Time your launch to suit your audience. Daytime for a children’s book but evenings and weekends will all attract different audiences

Coffee and cake present quite a different launch image than cocktails and canapes- Keep your potential readers in mind.

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Daytime launch, cupcakes, fruit platter and mini scones.

Don’t overlook your local library for any type of book launch.

They already have a  potential audience of committed readers plus the rooms for hire are very reasonably priced or may even be free. It doesn’t hurt to ask the events librarian if they can help. It is even better if you are already a regular library user. And of course, libraries usually have convenient parking.

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A library launch may be perfect for your book.

Parking. How will your attendees get to the venue? Check the parking or public transport.

Also, look at room capacity fifty people might seem like a good crowd –unless of course, they are in a huge room like a ballroom. This can echo and seem awkward, try to get a sense of how many people plan to attend.

 

Words from My Heart.

My new book Fire & Ice is a book straight from my heart, one that I hope will find its way into yours. It is ready for Valentine’s Day.

 

wrte what you love and love what you write!
Write what you love and love what you write.

I’ve written a few books. Often, they reflected a popular trend or were something that I felt that I ‘ought’ to write.

This changed in September 2018, when I began writing the story that I wanted to read. It was sparked by watching the ice dancing at the Pyeong winter Olympics. What fascinated me as a writer was how much emotion the skaters expressed, through facial expressions and gestures. As I learnt more, I understood how partnerships were formed, and the idea of an Australian ice skater was born.

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Two hearts that beat as one.

I decided she’d travel to Bergen Norway to meet a partner. I’d visited Bergen and it made me think of Vikings. Soon I had two stories to tell, a contemporary one and one in the distant past.

Research gave me insight into Viking customs and lives, but most of all I wanted to establish the emotional connection, love that lasts through time, soul mates. I wasn’t writing to a formula I wasn’t writing to please anyone else, just for my own enjoyment.

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Reading for research.

As the story grew, I mentioned it to a few other people, it was now    October and one of them asked to read a chapter. She offered me a  contract to publish my yet unfinished book.

Suddenly, my dream was becoming reality, I had to finish the book. There were about thirteen chapters still Continue reading “Words from My Heart.”

This is Why You Should Attend Author Talks.

We all have limited time at our disposal so should you take time out to attend an author talk?

My answer is – it depends on what you want from the talkWoman reading jojo Silass unspalsh

Firstly, have you read any of the author’s books or do you intend to?

It’s true that you can probably learn something from every author, but if you don’t write fantasy you may not need to learn how that writer built their fantasy world

It makes more sense to attend a talk by an author of books in a genre that you enjoy. You will get more out of it and understand the nuances that he/she is talking about.

Do you want to know more about their books or their writing process?

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Have you heard from others that their talks are entertaining and meaningful?

One fairly well-known crime writer gave a talk that was so self-congratulatory and self-absorbed that he barely had time to listen to questions, much less answer them.

In contrast, I recently attended a talk by author Rachael Johns international best-selling author and writer of both contemporary fiction and rural romances.

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As a former English teacher Rachael is as you would expect is a big fan of both reading and writing.

Her first point was that ‘you have to be a reader to be a writer’

She quoted statistics from the University of Sussex, which showed that regular reading slowed the onset of dementia and also reduced stress by 66%. We readers know what we are doing!

Additionally, storytelling is important to society, offering escapism, relaxation, thrills, enjoyment and encouraging a capacity for empathy.

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It is fascinating to learn how a story came about, what hunches or subconscious suggestions added to the tale.

In her talk she debunked many myths about their being ‘only one way to write’ and ‘you must plan your story in detail’

As someone who never fills out a character profile sheet (which is often recommended ), it was thrilling to hear Rachael say that she never uses them. Her stories grow organically, as she learns details about her characters.

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The talk covered more topic such as what makes a book memorable? Why do we care about characters?  We want them to grow and change to face up to challenges. She said that ‘people are products of their pasts’. Past hurts, emotional or physical leave their marks. In real life we want happiness but in fiction, we seek drama and conflict As Rachael said, ‘we need to torture our characters.’

It is inspiring how normal those rarefied creatures called authors are, how pleased they are to hear that you liked their book and want them to sign it for you. And of course, you can thank an author by leaving a review of their book on Good reads or AmazonSANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

As a reader it feels good to meet your favourite authors, to thank them and say how much you enjoyed their book, but as a writer, it is encouraging to hear how scenes were deleted, how characters refused to behave, how the author struggled to completion.

An author talk can be a simple social event, with a chat and a cup of tea or a glass of wine afterwards, or it can be a lesson in what successful authors do that you could do too.