What did I read in February 2021?

As things in my personal life continued to take their toll-I used reading as an escape from reality.

Reading was my escape and refuge.

        Troubled Blood By J.K Galbraith.

Private Detective Cormoran Strike is visiting his family in Cornwall when he is approached by a woman asking for help finding her mother, Margot Bamborough — who went missing in mysterious circumstances in 1974.

Strike has never tackled a cold case before, let alone one forty years old. But despite the slim chance of success, he is intrigued and takes it on; adding to the long list of cases that he and his partner in the agency, Robin Ellacott, are currently working on. And Robin herself is also juggling a messy divorce and unwanted male attention, as well as battling her own feelings about Strike.

As Strike and Robin investigate Margot’s disappearance, they come up against a fiendishly complex case with leads that include tarot cards, a psychopathic serial killer and witnesses who cannot all be trusted. And they learn that even cases decades old can prove to be deadly . . . 

My review

I have mixed feelings about this brick of a book. At 900+ pages it is a lot to read. It could have been edited to a more manageable length without losing much. I did finish the book, but frequently I was lost in the morass of clues, diagrams, astrological and mystical information. The case is complex, at times horribly graphic and disturbing. I might have stopped reading, but I was intrigued by the developing relationship between Strike and Robin. Also, I suspect any woman who has been subjected to unwanted male attention will feel for Robin dealing with a crass male. But I admit I felt sullied after reading this and doubt I will read another Strike novel. I needed to read something lighter and more cheerful, so I picked up a mid-grade novel.

The Secrets of Hexbridge Castle by Gabrielle Kent.

 An exciting story of magic, adventure and a mysterious inheritance. Perfect for fans of ENID BLYTON, ROALD DAHL, and J K ROWLING.

Alfie Bloom’s life is dull. Dull and lonely, and this summer is set to be the most boring yet. All of that changes when he is summoned to the bizarre offices of mysterious solicitor, Caspian Bone, where he discovers he has inherited a castle full of wonders that has been sealed for centuries. Alfie is astounded to learn he was born in that very castle six hundred years ago during a magical timeslip. There, Orin Hopcraft, the last of the druids hid an ancient magic inside him, which others seek but should never be used. With the help of his cousins Madeleine and Robin, and Artan the flying bearskin rug, Alfie must keep the magic from terrifying adversaries and ensure that the secrets of Hexbridge castle stay secret, forever!

My Review

An exciting mid-grade book with lots to like. After all, who wouldn’t want to inherit a castle? Alfie’s life is humdrum and boring, but that is about to change. He receives a letter from Caspian Bone, a Lawyer inviting him to call to discuss his inheritance. This is Hexbridge castle and there is far more to the castle than meets the eye. Not everything is perfect. His new school Wrymwald House’s joint headmistresses, the Misses Murkle and Snitch, are renowned for their bizarre punishments, as well as their ability to bamboozle parents. There is far more to the castle than meets the eye. Alfie and his friends will be tested to the limit, as they battle to save the castle, the village, and themselves.

Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz. When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. After working with the bestselling crime writer for years, she’s intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. An homage to queens of classic British crime such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, Alan’s traditional formula has proved hugely successful. So successful that Susan must continue to put up with his troubling behavior if she wants to keep her job.

Conway’s latest tale has Atticus Pünd investigating a murder at Pye Hall, a local manor house. Yes, there are dead bodies and a host of intriguing suspects, but the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: one of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder. 

My Review.

It seems to me that Anthony Horowitz had fun writing this. His fictional detective Atticus Pund is the creation of an unlikable writer, Alan Conway. Few mourn his death, but he has left a fictional puzzle with his last book. Susan Ryeland, his editor wants to track down the last chapter. In doing so she puts herself in danger as the fictional world impinges on the real world. Adding veracity to the tale is the supposed interview from the Spectator magazine between Anthony Horowitz and Alan Conway. Horowitz exercises his considerable talents with wordplay, anagrams, puzzles and extraneous information. A tour de force.

Never Judge a Lady  By Her Cover by Sarah MacLean Award-winning author Sarah MacLean reveals the identity of The Fallen Angel’s final scoundrel in the spectacular conclusion to her New York Times bestselling Rules of Scoundrels series . . .

By day, she is Lady Georgiana, sister to a duke, ruined before her first season in the worst kind of scandal. But the truth is far more shocking–in London’s darkest corners, she is Chase, the mysterious, unknown founder of the city’s most legendary gaming hell. For years, her double identity has gone undiscovered . . . until now.

Brilliant, driven, handsome-as-sin Duncan West is intrigued by the beautiful, ruined woman who is somehow connected to a world of darkness and sin. He knows she is more than she seems, and he vows to uncover all of Georgiana’s secrets, laying bare her past, threatening her present, and risking all she holds dear . . . including her heart. 

Hardcover, Large Print, 613 pages

Published July 8th 2015 by Thorndike Press (first published November 25th 2014)

The author was recommended to me as someone who wrote whip-smart dialogue. I picked up the first title I saw, not realising at first that it was part of a series. It didn’t matter, the story although improbable, was entertaining and easy to follow. It had the readability factor which kept me entertained, even as my critical faculties were querying the implausibility of the plot. Just what I needed, pure entertainment.

My One True North by Milly Johnson From the bestselling author of the “glorious, heartfelt” (Rowan Coleman, New York Times bestselling author) novel The Magnificent Mrs Mayhew comes a warm-hearted tale about two people brought together by fate.

Laurie and Pete should never have met. But life has a different idea.

Six months ago, on the same night, Laurie and Pete both lost their partners. Overwhelmed by their grief, they join the same counselling group…and change their lives forever.

From their profound sadness, Pete and Laurie begin to find happiness and healing. Except, the more they get to know one another, the more Laurie begins to spot the strange parallels in their stories. Then Pete discovers a truth that changes everything—one which threatens to reverse everything they’ve worked towards.

But, as surely as a compass points north, some people cannot be kept apart.

With Milly Johnson’s signature “warm, optimistic, and romantic” (Katie Forde, bestselling author) style, My One True North is an unforgettable exploration of the power of love, friendship, and hope.

Paperback, 400 pages .Published July 23rd 2020 by Simon & Schuster UK

My Review.

I had requested this book from my local library a while back. By chance, it arrived after a death in my family. I debated whether to read it, would it be too depressing? I didn’t think Milly Johnson could write a depressing book, so I gave it a go. I laughed, and I cried, the characters were real to me. Laurie, the young solicitor, is aware that something was missing from her marriage. Fireman Pete is traumatized after attending the accident where his wife had died. Leavening what could have been a very sad story, were the extracts and malapropisms from The Daily Trumpet newspaper. A wonderful support group and a psychic who is amazed, to discover her powers are real, all propel the story forward to the desired happy ending, but not before a few surprises along the way.

A  Year at Castle Court by Holly Hepburn.

 The brand new novel from bestselling author Holly Hepburn, perfect for anyone who loves Jenny Colgan, Veronica Henry and Lucy Diamond. A Year at Castle Court is Holly Hepburn’s four Castle Court e-novellas collected together as a novel for the first time. 

Sadie is a single mum, nursing a broken heart. Her best friend from childhood, Cat, is burned out from working long hours as a chef in Paris. In need of a change, they decide to invest in their dream – running their own handmade biscuit shop in gorgeous Castle Court, a three-storey food court tucked away behind Chester’s bustling streets.
 
They soon discover that Castle Court has its own community – a little haven of delight against the stresses of the outside world. But not everyone welcomes the new business; the patisserie owner is less than pleased by what she sees as direct competition and Greg, who runs the fancy bistro that dominates one end of the courtyard, doesn’t think Sadie and Cat have the talent or business acumen to succeed. Luckily, there’s support in the form of the delectable Jaren, who owns the Dutch waffle house opposite Smart Cookies, and Swiss chocolate-shop owner, Elin. And if all else fails, the friends can drown their sorrows in Sebs cocktail bar on the third floor!


Paperback, 400 pages

A book, a coffee and time to read.

Published July 23rd 2020 by Simon & Schuster UK

A new author to add to my list. I found it an enjoyable read and it increased my pleasure that it was set in Chester, UK. The story flowed well, as Sadie and Cat began to establish their custom-made biscuit shop. In Castle Court, they find both friendship and rivalry and events that will challenge and change them.

A Home Away from Home by Veronica Henry.

Sunshine, cider and family secrets…

Dragonfly Farm has been a home and a haven for generations of Melchiors – arch-rivals to the Culbones, the wealthy family who live the other side of the river. Life there is dictated by the seasons and cider-making, and everyone falls under its spell.

For cousins Tabitha and Georgia, it has always been a home from home. When a tragedy befalls their beloved great-uncle Matthew, it seems the place where they’ve always belonged might now belong to them…

But the will reveals that a third of the farm has also been left to a total stranger. Gabriel Culbone has no idea why he’s been included, or what his connection to the farm – or the Melchiors – can be.

As the first apples start to fall for the cider harvest, will Dragonfly Farm begin to give up its secrets?

A Home from Home is the very best of Veronica Henry’s storytelling – gorgeous scenes you wish you could step into, a cast of characters who feel like friends, and an irresistibly feel-good family drama crossing three generations.

I generally enjoy books by this author, and this was no exception. I was drawn in immediately by the delightfully named Dragonfly Farm. The warm and sheltering home for generations of Melchior’s. They live across the river from their rivals the Culbones. A long-ago feud means there is bad blood between the families.  Dragonfly Farm is under threat as their uncle’s will has thrown up an unsettling surprise. Tabitha calls the farm home, and it is her cousin Georgia’s second home. They are shocked to learn that a third share of the farm has been left to a Culbone. What possessed Uncle Matthew to do that? The past must be explored to reveal the reasons for this decision.


What did I read in January 2021?

January was a difficult month as my husband was seriously ill and in hospital . More than ever I was looking for entertainment, escapism. and distraction. What helped? Good friends, books, cats and Netflix.

Being alone felt sad.

                 A Nose for Trouble by D.D. Line.

Betrayed by her lover and left for dead, Senior Constable Ellie Marsden and her canine patrol dog leave Perth and move to the small coastal town of Trinket Bay. Time heals Ellie’s wounds, but not her heart.

When thieves break in and steal drugs from the local doctor’s surgery, she realises it’s similar to her last case back in the city. If her ex-lover is in her town; can she close the case and arrest the man who almost destroyed her?

Brennan Cole has been on the run for almost three years, leaving behind everything he’s ever known and everyone he’s ever loved. He’s never forgiven himself for betraying Ellie, but he’s in too deep to stop now.

Trinket Bay is another perfect target. The police force isn’t as prominent here, the drugs they need are easy to acquire, and its tourists provide a ready market. It’s a simple in and out before they move on to the next town. But then he glimpses the woman he still loves. Can he escape detection before it’s too late?

Or will they learn cases of the heart never grow cold?

A Nose for Trouble is a contemporary romantic suspense novella set in the fictional town of Trinket Bay in South Western Australia.



My review

An exciting beginning to what promises to be an engaging romantic suspense series. Policewoman Ellie Marsden has relocated to Trinket Bay with her K9 companion Miss Charlie. After a heartbreaking betrayal, Ellie has given up on love. She and Charlie share an unbreakable bond and surely that is enough? So why does her heart race when she sees Brennan Cole, the guy who trampled on her hopes and dreams? Ellie suspects its more than a coincidence that he is in Trinket Bay. What is he up to? I loved finding out, and I look forward to reading book two in the Trinket Bay series.

                 The Alice Equation by Davina Stone.

Alice Montgomery’s life is like Groundhog Day. Five years after graduating, she’s still working in her mum’s bookshop, hiding her stash of romance novels under the bed and pining for the gorgeous guy who helped her over a panic attack before her final uni exam.

Aaron Blake loves to party—hard. His idea of commitment to anything other than his legal career is strictly three months. Until landing a job with the most prestigious—but conservative—law firm in town means he has to convince the partners he’s deeply committed to family values.

Aaron needs a fake date fast—and who could be safer than his bookish friend Alice?

Soon Alice finds herself dating her secret crush, sporting a daring new look of vintage frocks and itsy-bitsy lace lingerie.

Now the heat is notching up. Aaron’s feelings for his fake date are proving anything but safe, and Alice is discovering her inner sex-goddess.

But when secrets are revealed and lies uncovered, both Alice and Aaron will have to work out the hardest equation of all… what this crazy thing called loved is all about. 

The Alice equation is a whole lot of fun with a sexy vibe. Alice has secretly loved Aaron forever. Aaron is a player, his cut off point for relationships is three months. When he joins a law firm with ‘family values’ he needs to come up with a suitable partner and fast. So, Alice and Aaron begin a fake relationship. Alice is a newbie at the dating game. Her popular and gregarious friend Polly tells her that , ‘amazeballs sex, equals true love.’ Coached by Polly, Alice embarks on a  revamp of her wardrobe and her ideas. Aaron responds to the new Alice and they become’ friends with benefits’. There is great chemistry between them as Alice releases her inner sex goddess. Until it all goes horribly wrong. I really appreciated the drama and conflict. I enjoyed getting Aarons point of view as well as Alice’s. They both grew throughout the book which made it a satisfying read. Looking forward to book two in the Laws of Attraction series.  I received an Advance Reader Copy through Book Funnel and the author but was not obligated to post a review.

 We Witch you A Merry Christmas by Louisa West.

All she wants for Christmas is some peace and quiet. But Santa—and the local sheriff’s office—might just have her on the naughty list.

Rosemary Bell’s got a brand new bag. She has a great circle of friends, a sexy Irish boyfriend, and a daughter following in her witchy footsteps. But when she becomes the prime suspect in her grinch husband’s disappearance, the halls she’ll be decking might be behind bars.

Things get even bleaker when she’s called home to clean up her husband’s mess. When Rosie finds clues about a family she never knew she had, she realizes she doesn’t know as much about her past as she thought. And her present isn’t much better, when the local sheriff joins the investigation into her crimes.

With the local Sheriff breathing down her neck, it’ll take a Christmas miracle to keep her new family together for the holidays. This year Rosie might find herself witching for a Merry Christmas.

Charmed meets The Santa Clause in this short novel about the families we’re born into, the families we choose, and the magic of Christmas.

It doesn’t need to be Christmas ,for you to enjoy this book.

I’ve enjoyed the books in the Midlife in Mosswood series and had this on pre-order. Due to technical glitches, I wasn’t able to read it pre-Christmas. It didn’t matter, it flowed along and kept me entertained and intrigued anyway. Rosie makes intriguing discoveries, while the Sheriff launches a vendetta against her, and her ex discovers a few things for himself. All wrapped up in tinsel and Christmas, but it’s good to read anytime. The latest in the Mosswood series is, in my opinion, the best so far.

Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Featuring his famous literary detective Atticus Pund and Susan Ryeland, the hero of the worldwide bestseller Magpie Murders, a brilliantly complex literary thriller with echoes of Agatha Christie from New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz.

Retired publisher Susan Ryeland is living the good life. She is running a small hotel on a Greek island with her long-term boyfriend Andreas. It should be everything she’s always wanted. But is it? She’s exhausted with the responsibilities of making everything work on an island where nothing ever does, and truth be told she’s beginning to miss London.

And then the Trehearne’s come to stay. The strange and mysterious story they tell, about an unfortunate murder that took place on the same day and in the same hotel in which their daughter was married—a picturesque inn on the Suffolk coast named Farlingaye Halle—fascinates Susan and piques her editor’s instincts. 

One of her former writers, the late Alan Conway, author of the fictional Magpie Murders, knew the murder victim—an advertising executive named Frank Parris—and once visited Farlingaye Hall. Conway based the third book in his detective series, Atticus Pund Takes the Cake, on that very crime. 

The Trehearne’s, daughter, Cecily, read Conway’s mystery and believed the book proves that the man convicted of Parris’s murder—a Romanian immigrant who was the hotel’s handyman—is innocent. When the Trehearne’s reveal that Cecily is now missing, Susan knows that she must return to England and find out what really happened.

Brilliantly clever, relentlessly suspenseful, full of twists that will keep readers guessing with each revelation and clue, Moonflower Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction from one of its greatest masterminds, Anthony Horowitz.  

Published November 10th, 2020 by Harper (first published August 20th, 2020.)

I hadn’t read the first book in the series, but that didn’t matter, as Moonflower Murders reads well as a stand-alone. It was easy and engrossing reading, although at times I stopped to admire the clarity of the prose. Anthony Horowitz is at the top of his game and it certainly shows. The book is elegantly written,  and the descriptions are so clear that I pictured them effortlessly. The concept of a book within a book intrigued me. I have since learned that this was also used to good effect in the first book. There is so much information, so many clues, so many potential suspects. I doubt many people will have solved the murder. A terrific homage to the golden age of crime fiction.

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself? Would any of these other lives truly be better?

In The Midnight Library, Matt Haig’s enchanting new novel, Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.

Hardcover, 288 pages.

I raced through this book eager to know the consequences of Nora’s choices. Would any of her new lives be better? Would some be worse? Most people may have a regret or two, so the concept of trying out different lives certainly resonated with me. Some lives lived up to her expectations, while others had unintended consequences.

Books and cats were a comfort this month.

Books have always been refuge for me, and this month I was very happy to escape into other lives and worlds.


Stuck in place- books helped to visit different worlds,

Meet Versatile Writer, Sandi Parsons.

It’s a pleasure to welcome author Sandi Parsons to tell us about her contribution to the new anthology Growing Up Disabled  in Australia, edited by Carly Findlay.

Sandi Parsons.

Sandi is hard to categorise as a writer having written both fiction and non- fiction. The titles are ;

The Last Walk and Other Stories
Pepsi the Problem Puppy
The Mystery of the Sixty-Five Roses 

Along with pieces in the following anthologies:

Growing Up Disabled in Australia
Just Alice
Writing the Dream

Apart from her writing Sandi describes herself as , ‘a book nerd, librarian, cystic fibrosis survivor, and lung transplant recipient.’ She also a mum and a devoted dog owner.

Thank you for joining us- tell us about the new book which was released  recently. The book features contributions from forty people and I have since learned that one in five Australians have some from of disability.

Growing Up Disabled in Australia was released on February 2nd.

My story Don’t Have a Bird, is a love letter to my best friend Julie — with the first half detailing our physical growing up. After Julie died, the second half shows my emotional growth as I followed her footsteps in the transplant journey.

Quick-fire questions.

Late nights or early mornings? Early mornings – although I’m trying to write more later in the day.

When is walkies? First thing or Rotto cries. He’s a bit of sook.

What’s for breakfast? That is a very complicated question! I’m one of those people who can eat anything at any time of day. So, breakfast ranges from Saladas with Vegemite, re-heated leftovers, bread roll or muffin to traditional things like bacon and eggs or tomato sauce on toast … and occasionally salted peanuts and can of coke.

Breakfast can be many chocies.

Night out or Netflix? I’m a girl who likes to rock n’ roll all night and party every day so long as I’m home, on my couch, and in my pj’s by 9 pm.

What did you want to be when you grew up? A librarian who also writes books 😊 Ambition realized then!

Your hero? The hero of my story is a woman I will never meet – but her donated lungs have allowed me to have another chance at life.

Lungs

As you don’t show signs of disability, are people surprised when you identify as disabled?

In my case, media and medical professionals will refer to me as a ‘Cystic Fibrosis sufferer.’ An implication that my life is not worth living, full of suffering, and I am an object of pity.  It’s a term that falls smack in the middle of the social model of disability — which means that society disables more than the body does. I prefer the term ‘Cystic Fibrosis warrior’ — I’m at war, not only with my own body but also with a society where I am continually forced to break low expectations of my abilities. Others prefer the term ‘living with Cystic Fibrosis’.

It’s essential to check with someone to see which terms they prefer.

Sandi prefers to be known as a Cystic Fibrosis Warrior

How did you get started as an author?

My start was unique — in that, I had my first publishing contract before I’d written a word. I pitched an idea to Cystic Fibrosis Western Australia that there was a market gap, and we were the ones to fix it. The Mystery of the Sixty-Five Roses evolved from that meeting as a teaching tool to spark a discussion about Cystic Fibrosis.


Many would say you are extremely versatile; do you find it easy to switch from fiction to nonfiction?

Although I like to identify as a children’s writer, my nonfiction and memoir writing has had more published outings. Switching between the two was never my original intent — I received advice that sharing part of my story and journey with CF would help raise my profile and make my own voices middle-grade novel more attractive to a publisher.

Although my middle-grade novel is still looking for a publisher, that advice saw my writing diversify to become a hybrid of memoir, children’s fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. I think navigating between them has helped me become a better writer, but it’s also hard to classify what I do or identify a marketing niche.

Rotto and Chili looking quite unimpressed.

What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

I’ve always found first drafts to be especially tricky. Lately, I’ve been working on a dot point dirty draft process, which is essentially a list of all things I want to happen and which order, and it seems to help make that process a little easier for me.

The power of imagination.

Best writing advice/ Worst writing advice you ever received?

My Year 11 English teacher went on a rant about how I had spelled the same word wrong eight different times. She thought if I was going to get it wrong, I should be consistent about it.

If at first you don’t succeed…. keep trying!

I thought I had perseverance — I knew it wasn’t right and kept having a go. She marked me down to a D because of the spelling errors.

But spelling and grammar can be edited and fixed. However, there is very little you can do with a story that lacks imagination or emotion.  To me, the heart of a story will always be more important.

Best money you have spent as a writer?

Scrivener along with my yearly subscription to Grammarly.

Do you have a favourite author and why?

My favourite authors can change depending on what I’ve read lately. Right now, Jay Kristoff is topping my list — if for nothing else than the brilliant footnotes in the Nevernight series.

What books or authors have most influenced your writing?

Writers are readers and book lovers.

I think everything you read influences you to a certain degree — but one book had more of an impact than others — Robyn’s Book by Robyn Miller was the first book I read written by another person with Cystic Fibrosis. Until then, writing had been something I wanted to do — but the narrative society was telling me I didn’t have a future, so why bother trying? But if Robyn could write a book, then so could I.

Favourite quote (does not matter the source)

I’ve got two — one describes my writing style while the other describes precisely what happens when I have word salad.

“I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles.”

― Shannon Hale

“I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.”

― Alan Greenspan

Find out more about Sandi at www.sandiwrites.com.au

Photo by Secret Garden on Pexels.com

Meet D. D. Line, Author of A Nose for Trouble.

It’s a pleasure to welcome author D.D Line to talk about her new book, A Nose for Trouble. Book One in The Trinket Bay Series.

Thank you for joining us- tell us about your new book which was recently released .

Betrayed by her lover and left for dead, Senior Constable Ellie Marsden and her canine patrol dog leave Perth and move to the small coastal town of Trinket Bay. Time heals Ellie’s wounds, but not her heart.

When thieves break in and steal drugs from the local doctor’s surgery, she realises it’s similar to her last case back in the city. If her ex-lover is in her town; can she close the case and arrest the man who almost destroyed her?

Brennan Cole has been on the run for almost three years, leaving behind everything he’s ever known and everyone he’s ever loved. He’s never forgiven himself for betraying Ellie, but he’s in too deep to stop now.

Trinket Bay is another perfect target. The police force isn’t as prominent here, the drugs they need are easy to acquire, and its tourists provide a ready market. It’s a simple in and out before they move on to the next town. But then he glimpses the woman he still loves. Can he escape detection before it’s too late?

Or will they learn cases of the heart never grow cold?

A Nose for Trouble is a contemporary romantic suspense novella set in the fictional town of Trinket Bay in South Western Australia.

I read A Nose for Trouble not long ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. Gorgeous book, fabulous cover.

D.D .Line.

D.D. lives in beautiful Mandurah, a thriving coastal town in Western Australia.

When she isn’t writing she facilitates the Romance Writers of Australia Aspiring Writers Group. She organises Q and A sessions with authors, answers numerous queries and takes member questions to RWA. All in a voluntary capacity.

After an enthusiastic response from readers to A Nose for Trouble  D.D is busy writing book two in the Trinket Bay Series

This could be coastal Trinket Bay.

Late nights or early mornings? Both – I lose track of time.

What’s for breakfast? Black coffee and toast, muffin, or pumpkin loaf, depending on what I’ve baked.

Night out or Netflix? Netflix, but I enjoy the occasional night out

G &T or Tea/coffee? Coffee, but enjoy a social drink

Perfect weekend? A wander around Bunnings*. Coffee somewhere. Time to read and write. A movie. Family time. (I’d better say in no particular order.) 😉 *Bunnings is a large Australian chain of do it yourself hardware and home store

What did you want to be when you grew up? Happy.

What is for dinner tonight? Can you cook? What would you rather be eating? Chicken, rice and veggies. Cooking is okay, but I love baking. Steak sandwich and hot chips with aioli.

What brings you joy? Lifts your spirits, chases away a down mood. Singing, and dancing around like a crazy person in my office. Be grateful you’re only reading that, not seeing / hearing it.

Sing and dance like no-one is watching.

Your hero? My dad. He was the benchmark to which I judge all other men.

If you could choose three people to invite for a dinner party, who would they be and why? (Dead or alive) My hero! I would love to spend time with him, have our chats and solve the world’s problems like we used to do.

I think I’d be too nervous to meet others I admire. I imagine they’d be doing all the talking, and I’d be sitting there keeping my mouth full of food, so I didn’t say something stupid. LOL

Nick Hornby is quoted as saying, ‘Finding the confidence to write is a constant battle.’ Do you agree?

I disagree. I love writing. I need to write. Having the confidence to start putting my writing ‘out there’, however, was a challenge.

How did you get started as an author? Does wanting to impress my senior year English teacher count? No? Life happened. Then I started writing again after a miscarriage because escaping into words and other worlds helped me deal with the grief. Then I remembered how much I loved to write stories, so I kept writing.

Escaping into words

What is your writing routine? I write in the morning. I write at night. I write while waiting for kids to finish school. And in between whatever else it is I have to do.

Do you find pleasure in writing? I’ve heard there’s a fine line between pleasure and pain, and when you’re writing, you walk that line. When everything’s flowing and the words are working—it’s exquisite.

Have you always written? No, but I have always been a reader.

Dante one of D.D’s dogs. He’s named after the Italian poet Dante.

What inspired  A Nose for Trouble?  An anthology call out by Gumnut Press. They were looking for stories about dogs. I have two dogs that are a bit crazy. We follow most of the stories about things they’ve done with ‘it’s lucky they’re cute.’ I decided I wanted a clever dog to feature in my story and came across an article where the Western Australian Police announced three new canine recruits had joined the force, and my story evolved from there.

Banjo-named after Australian Poet Banjo Patterson.

What time of the day do you usually write? I can write at any time.

What is the most difficult part about writing for you? I call it ‘soggy middle syndrome’. I know how my story begins and how it ends, but sometimes the points to get from here to there are a little haphazard.

What is your work schedule like when you are writing? I have a job, and a family who for some crazy reason like to spend time with me, so I work around them.

What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk? Hmm, maybe that I write notes to myself like “remember on page 24 when ‘this’ happens? Make sure on page 49 you wrote ‘that’” sort of thing. Or is that a crazy one? Might be another of those ‘fine line’ things.

Where would we be without our notes?

Did you do any research for your current book? Yes, an interview with a retired police officer who is a brilliant source of information, the canine patrol unit, and their relationships with their handlers.

The next book involves a winery. I’ll have to do lots of research on that. 😉

D.D’s next line of research.

Do you have a favourite character that you have written? If so, who? And what makes them so special? Oh, hard question. I have a story in my drawer, a paranormal romance, about a cursed Romani magician. Nicolae is entirely too attractive for his own good, much too charming to resist, and for all his outward confidence, is someone desperate to right a terrible wrong. And he’s sitting there waiting for me to be an experienced enough writer to finish his story.

Best writing advice/ Worst writing advice you ever received? Best – write what you love. I’m not listening to any negativity.

Best money you have spent as a writer? A great editor is worth every cent.

Do you have a favourite author and why? Way too many to fit here.

Photo by Mohan Reddy Atalu on Pexels.com

What are you reading now? I am beta reading a yet to be published book, therefore can’t say the name, but it’s a paranormal romance and I’m enjoying it.

What books or authors have most influenced your writing? For a long time, I believed I was a horror writer, but my characters kept wanting to do that kissing ‘stuff’. I read Stephen King and Dean R Koontz in my formative years.

Western Australian author, Jenny Schwartz, was a great paranormal romance influence. Carolyn Wren, also a Western Australian author, made me fall in love with romantic suspense. Polly Holmes, yes, another WA author, introduced me to cosy mysteries. I read many genres, so I am always learning something.

Love is in the air.

Favourite quote “Love is not the dying moan of a distant violin – it’s the triumphant twang of a bedspring.” S.J Perelman.

Favourite book/story you have read as an adult? Another of those ‘too hard questions.

Favourite book/story you have read as a child? The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe.

Biography

D. D. Line lives in coastal South Western Australia with her family, a curious cat, and two pups trying to dig their way back to Central Queensland—we’re Sunshine State ex-pats.

Reading was her favourite childhood pastime. In her senior year, thanks to a crush on her English teacher and her desire to impress him, she developed a deep love of writing stories.

She writes Romantic Suspense, Paranormal Romance, Contemporary Romance and Speculative Fiction. Her short stories have featured and placed in KSP Writing Centre’s Spooky Stories Collections, Western Australia and Queensland Writing Group anthologies, RWA’s Little Gems Moonstone anthology and GEM – a 2014 Dr Liz Huf Memorial Tribute anthology.

She’s been a child wrangler, a mini lab photo developer, an admin assistant, a copyeditor, a proofreader, (no, she can’t edit her own work), and a wannabe baker who wishes she could sing.

D. D. Line is the Aspiring Ambassador for Romance Writers of Australia (RWA) and a member of the Australian Romance Readers Association (ARRA). She loves hearing from her readers. You can find her here.

https://facebook.com/ddlauthor

https://ddlineauthor.blogspot.com/

https://www.instagram.com/d_d_line/

https://facebook.com/ddlauthor/videos/675006573152129   (book trailer)

Buy links

https://www.gumnutpress.com/product-page/a-nose-for-trouble

https://www.kobo.com/au/en/ebook/a-nose-for-trouble-3?fbclid=IwAR3hudHY0Xbp2O1pPEKYUdK8X01vZN1d3MVSrgntmzGtBS-FBrSZ56YL0cs#ratings-and-reviews

Meet Davina Stone whose book The Alice Equation is launches today!

It’s a pleasure to welcome author Davina Stone to talk about her new book,

The Alice Equation.

 I’ve just finished reading it and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Available as e book or print.
https://www.davinastone.com/book/the-alice-equation/


https://books2read.com/TheAliceEquation

Davina, thank you for joining us- tell us about your new book  which releases today! 

The Alice Equation – Sometimes love is complicated

Alice Montgomery’s life is like Groundhog Day. Five years after graduating, she’s still working in her mum’s bookshop, hiding her stash of romance novels under the bed and pining for the gorgeous guy who helped her over a panic attack before her final uni exam. Aaron Blake loves to party—hard. His idea of commitment to anything other than his legal career is strictly three months. Until landing a job with the most prestigious—but conservative—law firm in town means he has to convince the partners he’s deeply committed to family values.

Aaron needs a fake date fast—and who could be safer than his bookish friend Alice?

Soon Alice finds herself dating her secret crush, sporting a daring new look of vintage frocks and itsy-bitsy lace lingerie.

Photo by Jill Wellington on Pexels.com

Now the heat is notching up. Aaron’s feelings for his fake date are proving anything but safe, and Alice is discovering her inner sex-goddess.

But when secrets are revealed and lies uncovered, both Alice and Aaron will have to work out the hardest equation of all… what this crazy thing called loved is all about.

It’s a sweet sexy rom/com about love, friendship and family and it’s the first in a series (The Laws of Love).

Are you writing anything else?  The second book The Polly Principle is off for proofreading and will be out in April 2021 and I am working on the third in the series, The Felicity Theory.

We will talk about your writing, but first some quick-fire questions.

Late nights or early mornings?   I have always naturally been a night owl, that’s when I get my best ideas.  But I’m training myself to write in the mornings now since I know my brain is clearer.

G &T or Tea/coffee?   I love a good G&T but the reality is I have no alcohol tolerance at all, so for me it’s a cappucino or two in the morning and copious amounts of French Earl Grey tea in the afternoons

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Perfect weekend?  In my hammock reading a good book.  I just don’t get enough reading done at present and my TBR pile is humungous.

What did you want to be when you grew up?  Grow up?  I haven’t yet. But I always wanted to be a writer.  Or an actress.  Never made the actress, though I tried.  Hopefully I’ll make it as a writer!

What brings you joy? Lifts your spirits, chases away a down mood? 

My garden. I grow succulents and herbs and a few veggies.  The latter still in experimentation phase, I had a crop of teeny-weeny wizened carrots and about 20 broad beans. But every morning I wander and water and talk to my plants and my trees. Being in nature always lifts my spirits

Photo by Maria Orlova on Pexels.com

What inspired your new book?   

My fascination with human relationships and particularly why we fall in love and with whom. Thinking about this inspired the series, “The Laws of Love” because I believe there are powerful natural laws at play when we fall in love, a bit like the laws of the Universe.  Love is such an amazing thing, it can make the world a better place and without it we really lose our way. I really don’t think love is an accident, and I wanted my books to have totally Happy Ever Afters, so that’s really why they became romances.

What is the most difficult part about writing for you? 

Final edits.  Urgh.  Missing those last typos.  And I fiddle to try and tweak things, because I’m a bid OCD.  A very bad habit.

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?   All over the place.  I intend to change that, but I find writing sprints is the only way I get a book written.

What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?   I daydream my characters into life.  They play out in my mind like movie scenes, what they say, how they feel, I even speak some of the lines (usually when walking alone, otherwise people will think I am mad). Then when I write it seems to flow. I can’t just sit down and write a scene properly without this process.

Photo by Mateusz Dach on Pexels.com

Did you do any research for your current book?

Not really.  I worked in different areas of health and mental health as an occupational therapist for many years. I use the things I learned from that in my books but it’s kind of organic, and sub-conscious to be honest. I only research when I need to make sure details are correct.  I’d love to write historical, but I fear I’m too lazy to get my facts right.

Do you have a favourite character that you have written? If so, who? And what makes them so special?  

I have such as soft spot for Carts, (Aaron’s best friend in The Alice Equation and The Polly Principle.) He is kind of dorky, and naïve where women are concerned, but has a heart of gold and so deserves love.  I will say no more, except to hint that things go okay for him in the end.  And Polly, I love how naughty and feisty she is.

Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions?  Can’t answer that, I have too many emotions.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Best writing advice/ Worst writing advice you ever received? 

“You don’t think yourself out of writer’s block, you write your way out of it.”  Not sure who’s words these are,  but it’s true.

Best money you have spent as a writer? Great editor, great cover designer

Do you have a favourite author and why?  I can’t choose, really, don’t make me.

What are you reading now?   All Our Shimmering Skies by Trent Dalton. It is so beautifully written it makes me want to cry on every single page.

What books or authors have most influenced your writing? 

Helen Hoang, Amy Andrews, (she writes such hot sex). Talia Hibbert, Alexis Hall, Jennifer Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips for her quirky plots.

Favourite book/story you have read as an adult?  The Book Thief

Favourite book/story you have read as a child?  The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.  Magic really does happen at the back of wardrobes you know!

Thank you for chatting with us Davina, wishing you every success with the book. I am looking forward to reading book two.          _____________________________________________

Reconnecting with the Blog. Books and Mayhem in 2020.

        As it has for many others, it’s been a tough ending to the year. I’ve been in waiting rooms, and hospital rooms, and chewing my nails with anxiety. I’ve given up having a social life, or any life, beyond visiting the hospital .I’ve gained a huge appreciation for my friends ,who have been there for me, day in and day out .My gratitude to them is immense.

        Another thing that has kept me going, is the power of books, to entertain, to divert, and even to amuse me.

Photo by Samson Katt on Pexels.com

         I’ve appreciated my Kindle more than ever, with its ability to contain a whole library in a portable form.

        By October, I‘d reached my yearly goal of reading eighty books. I didn’t stop reading, but I didn’t have the energy to fill in my Good reads. The important thing was that I was still reading.

        I read books related to the craft of writing. Easier than actually writing a book, right? In October I was 50,000 words into the first draft of a new book. With all that was happening in my life that has stalled.

        My taste in books changed, I no longer wanted drama and conflict. Like many others, I began to appreciate the distraction of stories. I wanted a happily ever after, I wanted goodness to prevail. I couldn’t control what was happening in the world. or even in my world, but I could choose the books that I read. One element of control in the chaos.

        Others had their plans disrupted too, and a promised interview didn’t take place. But things are changing, and a new year is a new beginning.

Photo by Ann H on Pexels.com

        While life isn’t back to normal, I do have a sense of how my days will be. So, I am reconnecting with the blog, and thank you for your patience. You can also find my Facebook page Sonia Bellhouse’s Chatting with Authors, where I post bookish snippets and interviews. There are three exciting interviews lined up for the New Year. Wishing you and yours the Happiest of New Years. See you on the other side in 2021 .

What Was I Reading in September 2020?

Most of the books I read this month were downloaded on my Kindle. I appreciate the benefits of the Kindle but also find it can be frustrating if I want to leaf back over a book.

The Cottage at Hope Cove by Hannah Ellis.

The summer that changed everything…

Lizzie Beaumont has it all: a great career, a wealthy fiancé, and the wedding of her dreams just months away. But when her fiancé puts work before her again, she sets off for a week in the picturesque town of Hope Cove. She’s hoping for time away from the chaos to find herself.

Instead, she finds Max.

When the gorgeous guy next door asks her for decorating help, Lizzie finds herself all too eager to please. The week she expected to drag suddenly flies by, and before she knows it, she has to return to her other life. The life with the impending marriage and the fiancé she loves.

Or does she?

One week with Max has left her questioning her life choices. Is her fiancé the man of her dreams, or just the man who asked? Now Lizzie must decide what her life will be. Will she go for the safe and predictable route, or take a chance on a man she hardly knows? No matter what she does, someone’s heart is going to break. She just doesn’t want it to be hers.

My review:  What if your perfect life began to feel less than perfect?
What if your partner spent more time at the office than with you?
What would it take for you to wake up and question everything?
Has Lizzie been sleepwalking through her life?
Could one week at a Cornish cottage be enough to crack her eyes wide open?
I enjoyed this engaging story and related to the heroine’s dilemma.Should she give up all she knows, for an illusion, or is her previous life the illusion?

After finishing the book I realised it was the beginning of a series and I would be happy to read more.

Book or Kindle- what a choice!

The Women’s Pages by Victoria Purman

From the bestselling author of The Land Girls comes a beautifully realised novel that speaks to the true history and real experiences of post-war Australian women.

Sydney 1945 The war is over, the fight begins.

The war is over and so are the jobs (and freedoms) of tens of thousands of Australian women. The armaments factories are making washing machines instead of bullets and war correspondent Tilly Galloway has hung up her uniform and been forced to work on the women’s pages of her newspaper – the only job available to her – where she struggles to write advice on fashion and make-up. As Sydney swells with returning servicemen and the city bustles back to post-war

The Gorgeous cover!

My Review: This book was such are a revelation and an eye-opener to what the older generation went through. Not the elites we so often are told about, but the working class, those at the bottom of the ladder- most people. I was absorbed and immersed in another time and place. Infuriated over the derogatory remarks and dismissive attitude to women. Seething at the unfair treatment of women in general and war widows and their children. It’s a very readable book, one that you feel you want to read just one more chapter.

I received a free copy through a promotion with Book Stack but was under no obligation to review it.

Being Mortal by Atul Gawande.

In Being Mortal, author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending

Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extend suffering.

Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession’s ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person’s last weeks or months may be rich and dignified. 

My Review :Have you ever thought about death and dying? Unless someone close to you has died you probably haven’t. There is so much focus on ‘living well’ but what about ‘dying well?’ Not in a one-upmanship kind of way, but one that allows the person the right of choice as to what they want as their time approaches. Medical intervention at all costs? What if that results in less quality of life? Prioritize the quality of life, over living? To die at home or in the hospital? What are the things the patient doesn’t want to compromise on? Can hospice care be right for some people? It asks how much autonomy do we want to delegate to some else? A very thought-provoking book.

The Wash by Lisa Wolstenholme.

Clara wants to be a writer  a passion she shares with her older brother, Jake. But when Jake is found dead in the wash on Scarborough beach, it shakes her to the core and she’s desperate to understand why he took his life.

While studying Psychology at uni, she finds herself assisting with a rehab program in a low-security prison. There she meets Michael, an alcoholic and petty criminal with an irresistible pull. He reminds her so much of Jake and constantly challenges her, testing her resolve to stay true to her partner, Dan.

As time moves on, Clara sets up her own practice but cracks are forming in her work and relationship with Dan, not helped by Michael weaving his way in and out of her life. She’s treading water and still plagued by Jake’s death.

Can she overcome her loss and save Michael before it’s too late?

A collision of loss and love. 

My Review:The Wash is a short novella, but a thought-provoking read, asking can we save people, or do they need to save themselves? Do we meet people by chance or is there some purpose to our meeting? Lisa’s insights into the lures of alcohol drugs and sexual attraction make compelling reading. A perfect cameo of a book.

The Little Cottage on the Hill by Emma Davies.

Idyllic location!

There’s blossom in the trees and daffodils as far as the eye can see. Maddie is looking forward to a fresh start in the countryside, but there’s just one little problem…

Following a scandal at her high-flying PR agency, twenty-six-year-old Maddie flees London to help promote what she thinks is going to be a luxurious holiday retreat in the countryside. Everything is riding on her making a success of this new job…

Yet when she arrives, Maddie is horrified to find a rundown old farm in a terrible state. The brooding and secretive owner, Seth, spent all his money on leasing the land when he fell in love with the beautiful, dishevelled farm cottages and the very romantic story behind them.

When Maddie discovers an old painting by the original owner’s wife, she unlocks the secret of the farm’s history and quickly realises she must start getting her hands dirty if this very special place is going to have any chance of survival. As she and Seth begin working together, the stunning view from the top of the hill is not the only thing that’s leaving her breathless…

After weeks of hard work the dream looks like it might become a reality, until a secret from Maddie’s past threatens to snatch it all away again.

 Can Maddie find a way to save the business and herself? Will she finally find a place to keep her heart within the crumbling walls of the little cottage on the hill?
Perfect for fans of Jenny Colgan, Lucy Diamond and Debbie Johnson who are looking to escape to the countryside and fall in love watching the seasons change.

My review:Such a pleasure to read a book that easily transports you out of your mundane world and leaves you absorbed in the story.For an expat Brit such as myself there is a sense of nostalgia too. A relaxing read that celebrates friendship, finding your place in the world, and following you heart. Perfect escapism.

Aconite & Accusations by Ruby Loren.

Book Five of the Witches of Wormwood series.

 On Midsummer’s Eve, a town will vanish.

A witch, a devil, a detective, and a talking cat are the only ones who can stop it from happening.

That makes the sudden appearance of a mystery body even more inconvenient than usual.

Who is the unidentified man in the river, and why does the invisible barrier around town seem to keep letting in the worst kind of people?

…Like the three annoying ghost hunters who roll into Wormwood with about as much supernatural ability between them as a cheese sandwich.

…And the definitely evil Amber Leroux who arrives intent on digging her claws into DCI Admiral.

Wormwood has always been weird, but things are about to get even more strange.

My review:The series just keeps getting better. As usual, things appear bad in Wormwood and they are about to get worse. The barrier that keeps the town isolated is disintegrating. The town’s Mayor is actively working toward attracting tourists. They will unwittingly aid  in the town’s destruction.

Hazel’s business is booming as quickly her worries are multiplying. Her magical abilities are  better. She fears she won’t be able to stop the destruction of the town she now calls home. Following her instincts, she is drawn towards the river, where she finds a body. The river usually keeps strangers out of Wormwood, but now they are flooding in. D.C.I .Admiral has had to arrive on foot to investigate. He was unable to gain access any other way. As usual, the coven Hazel leads, and which is supposed to have her back, is divided. There is a new witch in town Amber Leroux. And she isn’t friendly. Then there’s the Witch  Council, and the mystery of Hazels father’s disappearance. Jesse is back and appears to be being helpful. Hemlock  is the most unhelpful familiar. He tries not to get involved and now has a protégé of his own to teach his unhelpful ways.

I was sad to see the series end and I have since heard that book six is on its way, so looking forward to it.

Studying Her Vikings by Skye Mackinnon

Travel back in Time. Bring  a Viking  into the present so he can help save the world. Easy, right? Before she can travel back in time, she needs to go back to school to learn Old Norse, decipher runes and try not to fall for the sexy Runology professor who’s hiding a dark secret…

Lainie had given up hope on ever getting out of the slums of New London. Applying to the prestigious Time Travel Academy seemed like a waste of time, but when she’s accepted and assigned Vikings, her life changes forever.

A time travel reverse harem full of action, intrigue and hot Vikings. Part of the Time Travel Academy world.

My review. The Viking and time travel and angles appealed to me and I downloaded it- without realising that it was a series..Of course, I ended up downloading the rest and in parts it’s a steamy read. Three gorgeous men and Lainie ,getting up to all sorts of sexy stuff. Apart from that, its intriguing story and I was sorry to learn that there are no more TTA Vikings books planned

Spooky month! Meet Louisa West.She’s Talking About Her New Book, Jealousy’s A Witch.

Hi Louisa,

Thanks for joining us to talk about your new book Jealousy’s a Witch which is out now. Love the title by the way!First some witchy questions.

What drew you to write about witchcraft?

I wanted to write a story about a single mother who was trying to find herself. We all know what it feels like to not be living our best lives – whether it’s because of work commitments, family responsibilities, or something else. Rosie came to me as a fully-realised single mum moving to a new town to escape her past and carve her own path forward. I decided to make her a witch because it added a dimension to her that would be a great way to show her personal growth while hinting at the power she had all along – but can now start to manifest.

Why do you think the topic resonates with so many women? Personally, I think we have been all shoved into the ‘good girl’ stereotype for so long that it’s an enjoyment of the opposite.

You can read this as a standalone, but I bet you’ll want to get Book One: New Witch On the Block too.

Witches are usually all about a person claiming themselves and their power. I don’t think of witches as either ‘good’ or ‘bad’ in the traditional sense; I think they make their choices the same as everyone else. But their power allows for a certain sense of freedom, and I think that’s such an important message.

Girl power , is it more than makeup?

Do you have a favourite witchy book/movie?

My favourite witchy book/movie would have to be Practical Magic. The book came to me at a time when I needed it the most, and the movie adaptation is just spectacular with those gorgeous sets and the strong 90s vibes.

Favourite witch? Hermione Granger.

Do you have a playlist for your books? My dear friend and editor Kimberly Jaye did create a playlist for New Witch on the Block for me to play at my online launch party! I rely heavily on her talents, because I tend to listen to the same 20 or 30 songs I’ve been listening to since 1996. If you’re interested, you can listen to her fabulous playlist here:

Do you have any other books planned apart from this series?

Romance is a special kind of magic!

Funny you should ask! I’ve actually begun revising an old contemporary romance project, with the hopes of writing it for fun between Rosie books. Watch this space!

What have readers told you they enjoyed about your Midlife in Mosswood series?

People are really responding to how relatable Rosie’s past with her husband is, and her need to find a better future for her and her daughter. They’re also loving Rosie’s fire, the relationship between Rosie and Maggie, and the small-town vibes woven throughout the series. I’ve had several readers comment that they want to live in Mosswood, which is a huge compliment!

What’s your writing day like?

Early mornings are Louisa’s best time to write

When I’m drafting, I try to be up early in the day – between 4am-5am. I write much better in the mornings, and like to squeeze in a couple of hours of word sprints before I have to get my daughter ready for school. I do 30 minute sprints, averaging 800-1000 words per sprint. If the muse is particularly strong, I might write a little in the afternoon/evening as well, but that’s the exception and not the rule. I try to be completely finished with writing by 11am, so that I can focus on marketing, my freelance work, and then family time in the afternoons.

Do you listen to music or work in silence?

Always silence, unless I’m in a coffee shop. I get distracted too easily to listen to music.

Do you have any non-writing related interests?

Loads! I love cooking, I love watching movies and tv series, and I am a bit obsessive over playing The Sims (a computer game). I also really enjoy spending time with friends and family, playing with my Great Dane (who I absolutely adore), going to the theatre (love Shakespeare), and doing home improvements.

Shakespeare wrote some pretty epic witches in Macbeth

What would surprise people to know about you?

I once met a serial killer. I want you to tell me more about that! Maybe the next interview.

Life lessons – what do you wish you’d known earlier?

I always knew I wanted to be a serious author. I’d have a helluva backlist if I’d given in to the urge 20 years ago, and now I’ve got to make up for lost time.

Is there any advice you’d give your daughter and other young women?

I’m terrible at advice, so I’ll take a quote from the amazing Dolly Parton (whose quotes feature at the front of every Mosswood book): Find out who you are and do it on purpose.

Dolly Parton.

A book that made you laugh or cry?

‘Black Beauty’ by Anna Sewell is one of the first novels I read as a child, and still makes me weep like a baby to this very day. Poor Ginger. This was my first real introduction to how cruel mankind can be, and it’s a lesson I’ve not ever forgotten.

Books can illuminate and educate or simply entertain.

A book that made you think.

My current read – ‘The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack The Ripper’ by Hallie Rubenhold. A fascinating inspection of Victorian London, with social commentary through the magnifying glass of London’s destitute lower classes. Sad, shocking at times, but insightful and incredibly introspective. It follows the lives of the ‘canonical five’ victims of Jack the Ripper from birth through to their deaths, without revelling in the gruesome ends they met.

A book that got you through a difficult time.

Practical Magic, by Alice Hoffman. I was newly single after nearly a decade of marriage and was on a soul-searching mission. I found myself in that book.

Its been wonderful to chat and I am looking forward to reading book three, We Witch you a Merry Christmas .

I have it on pre-order just in time for Christmas.

If people would like to purchase Jealousy’s A Witch, the links are:

AMAZON AU: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B088ZPMG7L

AMAZON US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088ZPMG7L

AMAZON CA: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B088ZPMG7L 

AMAZON UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B088ZPMG7L

How can people keep updated on your work?

The best way for them to keep informed and to interact with me is via my Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/magicalmayhem/

Sonia says- I know its a lot of fun on there!

Chatting with Mickey Martin

Hi. Mickey/ Michelle

Thank you for joining us- I’d love you to tell us about your new book series , the titles, release date and how you came to write it.

But first some quick fire questions

Hello Sonia,

Thank you so much for having me.

Late nights or early mornings?

It so depends on what’s occurring in life at the time…

What’s for breakfast?

It can range from a fruit and veg smoothie, to a bacon and egg muffin. Depends how organised I am. 😊

Night out ot Netflix? Netflix.

G &T or Tea/coffee?

Tea all the way…Unless it’s a social celebration, than it’s anything goes!

Perfect weekend?

Me, in the garden with my cats, before friends and family arrive for a game of pool and stimulating conversations and laughter.

Mickey’s new writing space.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

Marilyn Munroe or a back up dancer for David Bowie.

What is for dinner tonight? Can you cook? What would you rather be eating?

Chicken Schnitzels and Vegetables. I can cook, but it isn’t a passion of mine. I’d rather be eating my Italian girlfriends, Osso Bucco sauce with pasta.

What brings you joy? Lifts your spirits, chases away a down mood.

The joy of music.

Music. Hearing a loved one laugh. Sharing moments with those who are precious to me. Being in my garden, any garden. Writing. Swimming naked. The scent of rain. A thunderstorm. A buzzing Bee…I could go on. Life is such a gift…

Your hero? Everyone who survives after heart break and trauma,who dusts themselves back off, and continues through life with generosity, gratitude and a loving heart.

If you could choose three people to invite for a dinner party, who would they be and why?

My Mother… Because I Miss her dearly. Gordon Ramsey, because he’s hot, and he can cook the dinner for us… and, Alan Rickman, because his voice delights me.

 Questions about Writing. You write under the name of Mickey Martin. Why?

Being a twin, I guess it was easier for my mother to call out, Leah and Mickey, instead of Leah and Michelle. I never understood her reasoning, considering Michelle and Mickey have two syllables each. But who’s to question her fabulous thinking. My maiden name is Martin. Although my married name, Weitering, is cool within itself, I am essentially, Mickey Martin.

A dynamic duo or terrible twins?

I am intrigued by your twinness. Does Leah have much input in your writing ? Does she write too?

Funny you should ask about my twin. I had a project in mind, to write,a book with her I shared it with her 2 weeks ago…and she has agreed to co Author a book with me about,our diverse journeys, of how our childhood shaped us, and the oaths,we each too after leaving home. it will be hilarious I’m excited for her. and am hoping thus will encourage her to want to write more.

WOW! Maybe I am psychic after all! What a unique collaboration that will be!

What inspired your new series?

Life and the world we live in.

Do you want to talk about your previous publishing experience or not? ( I knew Micky had a less than happy time with a previous publisher.)

It was dreadful, but certainly a learning curve, and like many authors, it has made me so very grateful for the fabulous publisher and publishing press I am family with now. Thank you MMH PRESS, and Karen Mc Dermott.

Why do you think that stories of failure and redemption resonate so powerfully?

The sting of failure can help us learn and grow.

Because as humans, we all experience failure, and we can both learn and grow by other’s stories. Redemption is a part of life…whether you are the one who is saving another, or being saved. It’s all connected.

What time of the day do you usually write?

I’m very fortunate that I have the opportunity to write any time of the day, or night, and do.

What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

I put a lot of pressure on myself, to make what I’m writing as entertaining as possible. But, the most difficult thing for me, is questioning whether a line I write, is going to make sense to the reader. I have my own kind of language, where I say things back to front, and although things make sense in my head, when I say them out loud, it never comes out right. So, it is tricky at times, I can spend 10 minutes reading and re reading, a line that makes sense to me… but maybe not the editor or reader…. I’m lucky my hubby doesn’t mind me interrupting him anytime to say… “Does this line make sense to you…”

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

I can work a productive 4 hours straight, right through to a 19 hour bender. If I’m on a roll, I have to stop and remind myself I still have a family to feed and children to communicate with. I can totally lose myself in my writing.

What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Well, I don’t know if it’s interesting, but I’m a bit OCD at times. Everything around me has to be in its place before I can relax and settle into hours of hard writing.

A corner of Mickey’s Manor.

Did you do any research for your current books?

Yes, I researched mental disorders, chemical and biological warfare along with other bits and bobs.

Mickey has her husband’ support for her work for mental health

Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions?

No, absolutely not. Writing is feeling. It’s emotion. It’s sharing, influencing, storytelling, healing. Writing, whether you write fiction or nonfiction, taps into powerful emotions and opens a flood gate of feelings.

Best writing advice/ Worst writing advice you ever received?

Best advice: The world needs to hear this.

Worst: Can’t recall…must have blocked it out 😊

Best money you have spent as a writer?

Investing in my Authorship, and going on a writers retreat to Crom Castle, Ireland.

Do you have a favourite author and why?

Nora Roberts. She is my favourite author, because it was her books, and characters, that inspired me to write.

Part of Mickey ‘s writing studio.

What are you reading now? What books or authors have most influenced your writing?

Right now, for a break in between projects, I am reading, In His Protection, by P.L Harris. Authors that have influenced my writing would be, Nora Roberts, LaVyrle Spencer, Carolyn Wren and Sandra Brown.

Favourite quotes Expect Nothing, Appreciate Everything.

The World Needs More Healers, Helpers and Lovers. If You Can’t Find One. Be One.

Favourite book/story you have read as an adult?

Twilight series/Mr Darcy Takes A Wife/Chesapeake Shores/The Haunting Of Sunshine Girl/Zara

Favourite book/story you have read as a child?

The Folk In The Faraway Tree/Bazz The Dog/Snow White and Rose Red

The first book of the trilogy.

My soon to be released, The Guardian, was recently emailed off to my publisher at MMH PRESS! So, feeling pretty excited about that. My latest series is, The Given Trilogy. Book one, The Given. Book two, Dark Angel, and the third book of the Trilogy, The Guardian, which is launching October 2nd, 2020.

How did I come to write this series? I’m a very empathetic person, and even as a child, often felt confused with how the world seemed filled with such injustice. Like us all, throughout the stages of life, we witness human beings constantly making the wrong decisions.

From the bully in the school yard or workplace, cruelty to animals, repeat offenders getting another chance as our legal system failed the innocent. Corruption sweeping through our government, churches, and so on. (Sorry… trying not to get too dark here… 🙂

I wrote The Given Trilogy, to yes, of course, entertain and enthral the reader, giving them an escape from the real world, but, I also hoped to empower the reader by giving them a different world to think about, and consider that, every action they  take, in the here and now, can help to make our world a better place.

The last book The Guardian releases on October 2nd 2020

Can you tell us a little about it?

The Guardian.

After spending a decade within the walls of her safe haven, The Given, Lilliana Night must flee her home at the facility and re-enter the outside world once again in her fight for justice and to protect the one she loves.

Lilliana has no choice but to leave behind all she knows—and the man she loves—in order to do her part to eradicate one of the world’s most vilest of criminals.

Will her self-sacrifice for the greater good allow her to return home to her loved ones? Or will the evil that still walks the Earth be her ultimate undoing?

Decency dances on a dangerous stage with depravity and the results will be explosive.

I think you began the series before your non-fiction Thirteen and Underwater.

Yes, I had written both The Given and Dark Angel during a heart breaking time in my young family’s life. My eldest son, who was turning thirteen, began showing signs of severe social anxiety when school refusal began, and I stopped writing the Given trilogy. Throughout the months of our ordeal, in understanding and coming to terms with my sons disorder, I knew as a writer, it was my responsibility to share our story, in order to support other parents and careers who felt alone or isolated. And it was a chance to help educate and enlighten those that didn’t understand how debilitating living with someone with mental illness, can be, and how it impacts the entire family.

Can I include how Thirteen is supporting mental health?

 Yes, absolutely! I feel so blessed that Thirteen and Underwater has assisted with raising funds for Headspace, and is also being used as a resource tool for teachers and counsellors. Thirteen and Underwater, has even taken a trip across to Ireland’s, Inspire. (Similar to our Australian Beyond Blue)

Thirteen and Underwater is the incredible story of one boy’s harrowing journey through the paralysing forces of anxiety and mental illness that wreaks havoc on a suburban family. Lovingly told through the eyes of his mother, Weitering takes us into her family, exposing the good, the bad and the ugly of this increasingly prevalent disease and shines an all-important light on mental illness in all its debilitating forms. Deftly written, Weitering whispers to the emotional soul of motherhood and the unbreakable bond between mother and child, the fragility of the self and the resilience of the human spirit that lies deep within us all to never, ever give up – no matter what life throws at you.”

I am sure that Mickey has more exciting projects ahead. Thank you so much for talking to us.

Here are the links for Mickey’s books

https://www.mmhpressgroup.com/product-page/the-guardian

https://www.mmhpressgroup.com/product-page/dark-angel

https://www.mmhpressgroup.com/product-page/the-given

https://www.mmhpressgroup.com/product-page/thirteen-and-underwater

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What Did I Read in August 2020?

August was quite a different month to July, and I didn’t manage to complete as much reading as I had hoped.

The convenience of e-books

August had promised to be an exciting month. I’d planned to attend my first Romance Writers of Australia conference. Both the conference and the hotel were booked in January. Usually, its a great event with workshops and talks, as well as award presentations and a Gala dinner. Additionally, there are unofficial events to look forward to. Gossiping, grabbing a cheeky wine, meeting authors informally, sharing cake and confidences.

Empty chairs but the conference went ahead!

Sadly, it was cancelled and transformed into an online conference. This was excellent and well worth attending, with lots of inspirational and practical content. I spent five days at my computer listening to workshops and talks. It was an absolute credit to the organisers who had pulled it together so quickly.

That said, brilliant as it was, it wasn’t the conference experience I had heard about and hoped for. Maybe another year….

I’ve also started writing another book, a historical romance so that is keeping me busy

I’m still staying close to home and indulging in my passion for reading. All the books that I read this month were on my Kindle. I find it is both convenient and annoying

I find it both convenient and at times, annoying.

Convenient: Multiple books in a light and easy to carry format. Backlit for easy reading in bed. Enlarges text size at a touch, ability to add notes and highlights and a dictionary built in.

Personal gripe: I wish I had paid the additional cost for the model that included colour.

Annoying:  This may be personal, but I think my recollection of the books is not as clear. Additionally, where a book has notes, exercises, or appendices with a print book I could print them out I don’t have that option with the Kindle. Unless someone can tell me how?

Death in the English Countryside by Sara Rosett.

Location scout and Jane Austen aficionado, Kate Sharp, is thrilled when the company she works for lands the job of finding locations for a new film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, but then her boss, Kevin, fails to return from a scouting trip to England. Afraid that Kevin has slipped back into some destructive personal habits he struggles with, Kate travels to England to salvage Kevin’s and the company’s reputation before word gets out that he is missing.

Things go from bad to worse when Kate arrives in Nether Woodsmoor, a quaint village of golden stone cottages and rolling green hills, only to find no trace of Kevin except his abandoned luggage. Even the rumpled, easy-going local scout they consulted, Alex, doesn’t know where Kevin might be.

Increasingly worried about Kevin and with an antsy director waiting for updates about the preproduction details, Kate embarks on a search that includes a pub-crawl and cozy cottages as well as stately country manors. But Kevin remains missing, and she begins to suspect that the picturesque village and beautiful countryside may not be as idyllic as they seem. 

My Review.

The premise is intriguing- an American location scout searching for places to film a new adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. When the principal of the agency fails to report in, serious concerns are raised. He is usually the soul of reliability unless he’s gone on a rare bender. Kate, his assistant, is despatched to take over and to find out discreetly what’s happened to her boss When his car is found abandoned in the river, Kate’s fears are raised. Once the car is out of the river it proves to be empty. For Kate, it’s both an opportunity to prove her worth. It is also a chance to do some detective work. and location scouting of her own. Unfortunately, when her boss turns up dead, she becomes the prime suspect. Village rivalries simmer over the merits of competing locations. Local contact, Alex is helpful and charming, but is he all that he seems? One clue stood out for me early on, giving me a suspect. It’s the start of what promises to be an engaging new series 

Romancing the Beat by Gwen Hayes.

What makes a romance novel a romance? How do you write a kissing book?

Writing a well-structured romance isn’t the same as writing any other genre—something the popular novel and screenwriting guides don’t address. The romance arc is made up of its own story beats, and the external plot and theme need to be braided to the romance arc—not the other way around.

My review.

If you have been struggling to fit your romance into the Hero’s Journey story structure and failing, this book will help you understand why. A romance is not apt to work well with that formula. The female journey isn’t and shouldn’t be a carbon copy of the male journey. The author gives examples to illustrate the points she makes.  A quick and easy to read.

Feverfew & False Friends by Ruby Loren

A witch has vanished. The only clue to her whereabouts is a threatening letter and a gory trail that screams foul play.
When Hazel receives a similar letter, she realises that this mystery involves the entire town… and she could be the next witch to disappear.
It’s a race against time to find the missing woman and discover who is using their poison pen to turn the residents of Wormwood against one another..

My review.

Hazel has gained some acceptance in the Wormwood community, both magical and non -magical alike. Her cute teashop is becoming a community hub and D.C. I. Admiral has also gained a grudging respect for Hazel. Her newsletter ,Tales from Wormwood is well received, and life seems to be improving. She is gradually finding her talents are and they are unlike any other witches’ abilities. When threatened she can manifest weapons and has accidentally opened a between worlds chasm. Unfortunately, she has little control over these events. They can surprise her, as well as everyone else. Two similar murders suggest a vampire is on the loose and  put the townsfolk magical or not, on edge. Hemlock, her familiar is as sarcastic and unhelpful as ever. He will only do what she asks for treats and is always trying to sneak a look into the spell books. Meanwhile Hedge, who turns out to be Jesse’s familiar (and spy) is still living with Hazel. Troublingly,  she realises her eyes are a similar colour to those of the local demon. Then , another demon arrives on the scene , with a pack of hell hounds.

The First Draft is NOT Crap by Bryan Hutchinson.

The impetus for this book was from an article Hutchinson wrote nearly a decade ago, the article was titled, ‘The First Draft Is Not Crap’ and it became one of the most viral articles about writing. The assertion is the counter to the all too typical -the first draft is shit- mantra, which has led far to too many writers to give up and quit before their writing has had the chance to blossom. You can’t quit! You can’t. This book will give you not just the mindset, but also the tools to continue and finish. Keep-on-keeping-on even when every fibre of your being wants to quit. Formerly, “Serious Writers Never Quit.”

My Review.

This book is like having your own personal cheer squad, encouraging you to keep going. Most writers experience those moments of self- doubt, the question, what am I doing this for?  This is the book for you.

Belladonna and a Body by Ruby Loren.

Book four of this popular series

What happens when the sleuth becomes the suspect?

Once the town’s hero witch, Hazel Salem is now the prime suspect in a murder investigation.
Her fall from grace is nearly complete when a stranger comes to town and throws a spanner in the works – one large enough to alter the course of the murder investigation.
Hazel knows she’s being framed.
But who is out to get her… and how far will they go to put her out of the picture?
Wormwood has always had its secrets… but this one might be its darkest yet.

My review

Hazel was coaxed into publishing an ancient recipe in the town newsletter ,but she didn’t expect anyone to use it. She had labelled the Belladonna Bottle Curse as of historical interest  and  dangerous. A solicitor shows up with news of her inheritance from her mysterious and disappeared father. After ten years he is presumed dead and she is given the keys to his mansion and told she has money coming to her. Exploring the house, she hopes to find more clues to her parentage. What she does find suggests her father is not magical but points to him  conducting an  investigation of his own. This leaves her with more questions than answers. She returns to Wormwood to find that her creepy uncle, who considers himself the head of the Salem family, has opened a  competing  apothecary shop opposite her tea shop. She can detect traces of magic all over it and it appears to be doing a roaring trade. When a member of the coven Hazel now leads  turns up dead, all the clues point straight to Hazel, salt circle, runes  and the recipe.  D.C I Admiral who initially asked for her help is forced to consider her a suspect .As does the head of the Witch council.

An Unsuitable Lady for a Lord by Cathleen Ross.

Lord Aaron Lyle has one hell of a choice: a bankrupt dukedom, or marriage to some simpering society miss so his spendthrift father can get his hands on her huge dowry. He won’t do it. He has a reputation to maintain, and besides, he’d rather run naked through the streets of London than marry anyone at all. Surely, there must be a third option.
Then Lady Crystal Wilding walks into his life, a bluestocking, full of subversive thoughts, who hates the notion of marriage even more than he does. He is intrigued…and suddenly he has an idea. He invites the totally unsuitable lady home on the pretext of presenting her as a possible match…but in truth, Aaron has something far more pleasurable in mind. For her part, Lady Crystal has her own reasons for going along with his hare-brained scheme.
Imagine their shock when his highly proper family loves her and starts planning the wedding. Will their chemistry be the end or the beginning of them.

My review.

A delightful and entertaining read. Orphaned, Lady Crystal has a low opinion of men and of marriage. Lacking her father’s control, she is apt to do as she pleases. She has many progressive ideas and being tied in marriage to a man she hardly knows is not one of them. After a speaking engagement at Sir Walter Scott’s house goes wrong, she is the talk of the town.

Lord Lyle is being hounded to marry, to save his family estate, to fulfil his duty. Entirely suitable rich young women candidates are continually being presented to him. He can’t stand any of the simpering misses and refuses to marry. He attends Lady Crystal’s talk and is intrigued by her and her outrageous opinions and causes. Soon they are bantering about anything and everything and all they seem to agree on is their low opinion of marriage. With a strong-willed heroine, sizzling sexual chemistry, and a lord apt at seduction, this story will keep you entertained until the last page.

Romance Writers of Australia. Conference .Kindle. Convenient. Annoying. Death in the English Countryside.  Cosy Mystery. Romance. Witches. Writing. Romance. Witches of Wormwood series.