After ‘Scared’ -What Happens When Your Book is Picked Up by A Publisher?

The beautiful cover of my soon to be released( February 2019) book. I am thrilled with this design although I had a few to choose from.

Fire & Ice 1

 

As I wrote in an earlier post Scared- it is exhilarating and slightly scary when your dream of publication comes true. You may think that your hard work is over- well as I have learned it isn’t, the hard work is just beginning!

You get a contract and you need to read and understand it and agree to the terms before you sign it. I was fortunate that my publisher used a reputable contract from The Australian Society of Authors. (ASA)

Then the publisher emailed me to say ‘can we have a blurb’ sometime today. A ‘blurb’ is the enticing text on the back of a book that influences a reader to buy it. I’d never written a blurb before but by serendipity, I had downloaded an article on how to do so. It took a few attempts to produce one that I liked, with input from some writer friends. When finished the publisher liked it.

Coming February 2019. Olympic ice dancer Blaise Daniels partner has just called it quits –  leaving her with no chance of competing at the Winter Olympics. Determined not to give up on her dream, she travels to Norway to meet legendary skater Kristoffer Erikson. After a bumpy start, they connect both on and off the ice. Their partnership seems assured, but why do they both start having dreams of a mysterious Viking past? Can an ancient love be rekindled, or will an old tragedy complicate their present?
 https://daisylanepublishing.com/product/fire-and-ice/

Having poured your heart and soul into the book – now it is the hands of an editor. Soon you will have pages of queries and notes and suggestions to think about and incorporate.

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At the same time, you need to sort out the business side of things, like applying for an Australian Business Number if you are in Australia or complying with your area’s legal requirements.

Now comes the shared task of promoting your book. How will it be launched? My publisher is in the Eastern stares I am in Perth.

As it is my first book I am loving the idea of a physical book launch, so that means thinking of an affordable venue and wondering how to make the event stand out.

There is also an online launch to plan and a blog tour too. More about those as I gain more insights

Writing the book is just the first step., and how many more exciting steps are to follow.

The book is available for preorder through Daisy Lane Publishers.

Scared!

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Have you ever had a dream so big that it scared you?

Dreams are personal I know, and one person’s dream may be another’s nightmare. My lifelong dream is to write and publish a book and not just any book, a novel. One that I am proud of.

A few months ago, I was offered the opportunity to do just that. Out of the blue, I was offered a chance to have my (yet unfinished book) published. No strings attached, I wasn’t having to pay them, it was a genuine offer.

I was overwhelmed, excited, thrilled, exhilarated. What I hadn’t anticipated was that my writing would slow up. I liked my story premise, I thought I can pull it off so why did I find myself procrastinating? The simple answer was that I was scared. Scared of not measuring up to my own ideas of what a writer should be.Scared of failure and of success.

After much soul-searching, I realised that I was scared that I was not the person I thought I was, ‘a writer’ Since that realisation I have faced my fears and showed up at the keyboard daily. I will finish the book. How can I not? I have people counting on me.

I’d love to know what scared you, did you face your fears or not? .

 

What Did I Read in October 2018?

First a disclaimer- I have been busy writing a novella and doing some research and that has taken up a lot of my time but of course, I still found time to read! My choices have been perhaps more relaxing than normal, as I was reading for escapism.

 

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Dancing over the Hill by Cathy Hopkins

dancing Over the hIll

Cait’s thirty-year-old marriage is ho-hum, Matt her husband is as exciting as an old sock- They are ‘comfortable ‘together. If occasionally she wonders ’is that all there is?’ She accepts that yes, it is. Then she hears from a sexy old flame Tom and remembers the person she used to be, impulsive, a free spirit. Can she recapture that, and does she want to?  Witty and wise, with heaps of practical advice- better and cheaper than marriage guidance! I really enjoyed this new to me author

Death on The Menu by Lucy Burdette

Death on ther Menu

Actually, number eight in this foodie series about Key West, but I was able to read it as a stand-alone, I found the descriptions of both the food and Key West appealing. The mystery kept me guessing, the recipes sound delicious and it was a painless way to learn about the Hemingway legacy and The Truman Little White House as well as the links to Cuba.

Kicking the Bucket List by Cathy Hopkins

Kicking the Bucket list

Three sisters are reluctantly reunited by their mother’s death and her last wishes contained in her will. Daisy, Fleur and Rose have grown apart and it appears their mother’s last wish is to reunite them. They have to follow the terms of her will for a year and complete the tasks she assigns in her ‘bucket list’ before any of them can a collect their inheritance. Fleur is well off, Rose appears to be doing well but Daisy (Dee) really needs the money. If the three don’t all complete the list, then no-one gets anything. Throw in the charming and elusive Daniel who administer the bucket list and adds a little charisma to the task. At times funny but also sad and thought-provoking, it may get you to contemplate your own bucket list.

The Book Ninja by Ali Berg And Michelle Kalus

Book Ninja

If you love books, then can that love for books help you find love? Frankie Rose certainly hopes so. She leaves books on trains all over Melbourne with her name and contact number. The man of her dreams will be sophisticated, cultivated and well read.

Meanwhile, she goes on numerous dates with men who don’t fit the bill. Then she meets Sunny on a train, his quick thinking saves her from embarrassment and she could fall or him. But for his disastrous (in her eyes) taste in books.

Original, funny, quirky and quite delightful.

The Kitchen Table Tarot by Melissa Cynova

Kicthen Tarot

Interested in Tarot? Ever wanted to learn more? This is the book to provide the answers- I read through the information and did my first simple Tarot reading for myself. To make it easier, I noted down the cards as I turned them over and if they were the right way up or inverted After that I wrote down the meanings and found that I had a perfectly acceptable Tarot reading. If Tarot interests you, then this could be the book to get you started in doing readings.

To the Moon and Back by Jill Mansell

moon & Back

An easy to read romance.  Ellie is trying to get her life back on track after the tragic death of her husband. But he is still very much in her heart and occasionally in her living room talking to her. She knows he’s not real, but she doesn’t want to let him go. Is she missing out on life by clinging to the past and what happens when she feels an attraction to someone else?

The Perfect Location by Kate Forster

The Perfcet location

Even seemingly perfect lives hold traumas and secrets– an easy to read tale of three famous women who appear to have it all. Had a bit of fun ‘star spotting’ and wondering if I was right! Fast paced and reminiscent of Jackie Collins

1001 Ways to Be Creative by Barbara Ann Kipfer

 1001

At times our creativity can be elusive, but with 1001 ideas you are bound to find at least one or two which help you rekindle that spark of creativity. Ideal to dip in and out of, some ideas will make you giggle, some may well inspire you, and there are some great quotes about creativity too.

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Molly RinglandTeh Lost flowers of Alice Hart

Very much a publishing sensation the cover imagery, as well as the almost fairy-tale beginning, seemed to promise a whimsical and intriguing tale. At times there was an almost dark fairy-tale quality to the book- I’d describe it as veering towards the more literary end of the spectrum. There was so much sadness that ultimately, I had to will myself to keep reading and finish the book. I know many have loved it and the prose is engaging. As others have commented the last third didn’t sit so well with the first two-thirds of the book, it felt like a different story

What Did I Read in September 2018?

 

 

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The Jewels of Paradise by Donna Leon

Jewels of Paradise

This is the first book by Donna Leon that I have read. I chose it because it was a standalone and not part of her successful Commissario Brunetti series. The prose is quite cool and scholarly as musicologist Caterina Pellegrini is hired to research an almost forgotten Baroque composer Steffani’s supposed ‘treasure’. It would probably resonate more strongly with those who are more musically inclined than I am.

The Secrets She Keeps by Michael Robotham

 

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An absolute tour de force- in spite of the reader having a good idea what is about to happen, Robotham, manages to keep up the tension and suspense. While at times loathing Agatha it was hard not to feel sympathy for her too. There wasn’t one false note from a male author writing two female characters. Compelling.

High Tide by Veronica Henry

High Tide Veronica Henry

 

An appealing mix of characters from this well-known author. Kate back from New York, for her mother Joys’ funeral. Beautiful Vanessa from the big house is burying her husband Spenser and wondering why she isn’t grieving. Sam has moved to Pennfleet to escape loneliness and stress, but has he done right by his teenage children? Local Nathan keeps his wits about him to earn his living beyond the summer season.

Charming characters and an idyllic location with just enough spice to keep it interesting makes this a perfect beach or holiday read.

 

A Room at the Manor by Julie Shackman

A Room at the Manor

Lara returns to Scotland from Malta, her life in tatters. Her fickle boyfriend found someone else, her PR career is also gone. She needs to start again. What she has always wanted to do is bake, but perhaps with more charm and warmth than Kitty Walker her current boss allows at True Brew Tearooms.

A friendship with the former laird Hugo Carmichael provides an unlikely means of escape as Lara takes to the new challenge with enthusiasm, not everyone is happy though.

The delicacies that Lara creates will have you drooling, (don’t read if you are on a diet!) While handsome bad boy Vaughan, makes Lara dream of more than baking.

Write Smart, Write Happy by Cheryl St John.

Write Smart

Helpful advice from an experienced writer who has over fifty books published. St John encourages whilst at the same time demolishing all those pathetic excuses we make about not having enough time, self- doubt etc.

 

The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman

Rules of Magic

If you ever thought that being magical would make your life easier and happier this book will slowly but persistently demolish that notion. Sister Franny and Jet could not be less alike, but each finds in her own way that magic cannot solve all problems. While their charismatic brother Vincent who seems born for trouble enjoys his powers until he too learns that magic has its price. This prequel to Practical Magic works well as a stand-alone story.

New York Nights by C.J Duggan.  The second book in this series.

New York Nights

Aussie Sarah Williams dreams of New York and when an opportunity to work as an au pair there beckons she accepts. She is almost awed by the Worthington family who scrutinizes her prior to her meeting with Ben Worthington whose daughter Grace she is to care for. Unfortunately, for me, the book didn’t have the same pizzazz as Paris Lights. Perhaps Sarah was alone too much or stuck in the apartment as she spent long periods alone. I didn’t really get a sense of Ben either. I will be interested in what other readers think.

 

Grab Those Coloured Pencils and Improve Your Writing

  Do You Show or Tell in Your Writing?

 

It is often difficult to assess your own work, but there is a way to see what you are doing.

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Pencils to highlight your writing.Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Colouring! Yes really, grab yourself some coloured marker pens or coloured pencils and prepare to be enlightened.

I heard of this concept during a presentation that Natasha Lester author of The Paris Seamstress made during the Rockingham Writer’s convention. This is how she explained her system. By the way, this applies to all popular commercial fiction but not so much to literary fiction.

Action – Coloured PINK

Dialogue- Coloured-BLUE

Thought– Coloured YELLOW

Description-Coloured GREEN

Transitions—BLANK -NOT COLOURED

Back story-Coloured ORANGE.

She suggested colouring action and dialogue first  to show you the balance of those,

Ideally, they should be most of the page, at least 60% but not in huge blocks of colour. Interweave with other aspects of the story.

Doing this enables you to SEE what you need to change, to add or subtract.

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Photocopy a couple of pages of a favourite book. Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

 

If you feel this may be too confronting you can always photocopy two or three pages from a book and try it with them.

Your goal is not to emulate them, your goal is to see whether they get it right or wrong and to improve your own writing. The only person you need to compare yourself with is the self of yesterday are you learning, growing, progressing?

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Are These the Hardest Goodbyes?

When we take an animal into our homes, we don’t think of the hard reality that their lifespans are much shorter than ours

There is the joy of a new companion whether a puppy or kitten or of an older rescued animal who needs a home. We grow together, learn their personalities, their food preferences and their interactions with other family members and animals.

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We develop bonds of trust with them, we are their carers and protectors, the leaders of their pack. In simple terms, we grow to love them.

Although I used to have a dog, these days our animal companions are cats. Until last week I had three cats two girls and a boy. As previous cats have lived to a ripe old age of twenty-one I confidently expected many more happy years together.

Then, I noticed that Freya wasn’t eating, and this went on for a couple of days. Unlike the other two who we had, since they were kittens, we think that Freya had a tough early life.

 

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We called her Freya Aurora

When we first saw her, she was living in a neighbour’s shed and had just had kittens. He had no plans to feed her or offer her water. We asked for his permission to feed her and gradually earned her trust. Despite looking like a kitten, herself she’d had seven kittens. An animal rescue organisation took the kittens as we managed to catch them, one by one. We knew no one would want this skinny Mamma cat, so we kept her.

She was skittish and distrustful for a long while spitting and striking out at our other cats. At times I was sorry that we had kept her as it was so stressful. Gradually she mellowed, and we won her trust.

I worried about her as she grew inexplicably and enormously fat, the vet had no explanation for this. We cut her food down, but the weight remained. She looked like a fat wombat. Then as unexpectedly as it had started she lost the weight, returning to the petite size we remembered.

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The sudden weight gain.

She was still wary of men but grew to trust me and would curl up beside me in an armchair. Gradually trust was created and over time an armed neutrality was established between our male cat and her. She seemed to be a settled and contented cat.

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A content and secure Freya in the garden

It had all taken time and I realised that she had been with us for nearly eight years. When they had their check-ups in June the vet had mentioned she needed some dental work done and I was convinced that this was causing her problems now.

We went in at 9am on Wednesday morning and the vet examined her and said she needed hydrating and she would put her on a drip and conduct blood tests prior to doing surgery.

When the phone rang at eleven I knew it wasn’t going to be good news. I listened to words like fluid on the lungs, possible heart failure, cancer or other problems. The vet mentioned it might be kindest to let her go. I heard the words but could hardly comprehend them

We agreed to go back at I pm to say goodbye. We went in and. the vet explained more and assured us we were acting in her best interests Freya was brought in still with her drip attached and tried to get up. We stroked her and talked to her, and gently, gently the vet gave her the injection that would send her to sleep forever. I held her paw and talked to her, looking into her eyes and watched as her eyes slowly closed.

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Only then did my tears fall as we stayed with her for a while. I grieved for all the life she might have had, all the time we could have spent together. I hated myself for having to make the decision although I knew it was for the best and in my heart, I asked her to forgive me.

When we take on a pet we take it all on, the good and the bad, the happy days and the hard days. Allowing an animal to end its suffering after a long and happy life is hard but saying goodbye to one who should have had so many more happy years ahead is heart-breaking.

 

 

 

This is Why You Should Attend Author Talks.

We all have limited time at our disposal so should you take time out to attend an author talk?

My answer is – it depends on what you want from the talkWoman reading jojo Silass unspalsh

Firstly, have you read any of the author’s books or do you intend to?

It’s true that you can probably learn something from every author, but if you don’t write fantasy you may not need to learn how that writer built their fantasy world

It makes more sense to attend a talk by an author of books in a genre that you enjoy. You will get more out of it and understand the nuances that he/she is talking about.

Do you want to know more about their books or their writing process?

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Have you heard from others that their talks are entertaining and meaningful?

One fairly well-known crime writer gave a talk that was so self-congratulatory and self-absorbed that he barely had time to listen to questions, much less answer them.

In contrast, I recently attended a talk by author Rachael Johns international best-selling author and writer of both contemporary fiction and rural romances.

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As a former English teacher Rachael is as you would expect is a big fan of both reading and writing.

Her first point was that ‘you have to be a reader to be a writer’

She quoted statistics from the University of Sussex, which showed that regular reading slowed the onset of dementia and also reduced stress by 66%. We readers know what we are doing!

Additionally, storytelling is important to society, offering escapism, relaxation, thrills, enjoyment and encouraging a capacity for empathy.

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It is fascinating to learn how a story came about, what hunches or subconscious suggestions added to the tale.

In her talk she debunked many myths about their being ‘only one way to write’ and ‘you must plan your story in detail’

As someone who never fills out a character profile sheet (which is often recommended ), it was thrilling to hear Rachael say that she never uses them. Her stories grow organically, as she learns details about her characters.

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The talk covered more topic such as what makes a book memorable? Why do we care about characters?  We want them to grow and change to face up to challenges. She said that ‘people are products of their pasts’. Past hurts, emotional or physical leave their marks. In real life we want happiness but in fiction, we seek drama and conflict As Rachael said, ‘we need to torture our characters.’

It is inspiring how normal those rarefied creatures called authors are, how pleased they are to hear that you liked their book and want them to sign it for you. And of course, you can thank an author by leaving a review of their book on Good reads or AmazonSANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

As a reader it feels good to meet your favourite authors, to thank them and say how much you enjoyed their book, but as a writer, it is encouraging to hear how scenes were deleted, how characters refused to behave, how the author struggled to completion.

An author talk can be a simple social event, with a chat and a cup of tea or a glass of wine afterwards, or it can be a lesson in what successful authors do that you could do too.